Tag Archives: karen kidd

Co-Masonry in talkshows

I usually don’t watch podcasts and the like, but I happened to stumble upon an episode of Phoenix Masonry Live that had an interview with the most recent Past Grand Master of Le Droit Humain USA. This is quite an informative interview and it was done by a woman named Elena Llamas who proves to be a member of that very society and who on her turn had been interviewed on the Masonic Roundtable which is also quite informative. Earlier Masonic Roundtable had an interview with two prominent members of The Honorable Order Of American co-Masonry. I will embed the three podcasts below, but first I will note some of the notes that I took while listening.

In the interview with Randy Czerenda the rituals of LDH are spoken of. According to Czerenda the American federation has three rituals that the lodges can choose one from to work with. They are Lauderdale, Georges Martin and the North American Ritual.

In 1903 the first American lodge of LDH was founded in Pennsylvania. It used the Georges Martin ritual which Czerenda  describes as “continental”, but also as “not secular at all”. It is not secular, because it does not tell its members what the symbols mean. There is a Grand Architect of the Universe.

The Lauderdale Czerenda compares to Emulation, but slightly reworked. He describes it as “baroque”. It also has a Grand Architect, but contrary to the other two rituals, there is also reference to “God with a capital G”.

The third ritual, the North American Ritual, is (more or less) a combination of the other two and it is the most used in the USA.

You can find this part from around 50:00 in the video below, but the whole video is interesting if you want to learn about LDH and how it differs from “mainstream” Freemasonry.

To continue with Elena Llamas. In her interview at the Masonic Roundtable (episode 135) she proves less informed than Czerenda, but still this interview is very interesting. The rites in the USA are shortly spoken about from 24:30 on. She says that there are 22 lodges in the USA and the form of the “triangle” appears to be not just a lodge in the making in the American federation.

Llamas is asked about the differences between LDH USA and the Honorable Order of American co-Masonry. She notes a few. In American co-Masonry all members are “Brothers” as they use it as a title. Also they only work with the “Annie Besant Ritual” and this Theosophical leaning also shows in the fact that all lodges have an image of the Count de Saint Germain above an empty seat in the North of the lodge. This count is regarded “The Head Of All True Freemasons”. In LDH the portrait is allowed, but not inside the lodge. Lastly, American co-Masonry requests the belief in a higher power of its members, LDH does not.

What is also an amusing part of the interview is that when Llamas is asked how long it takes to proceed to the 33rd degree, she says “25 years” which is received with amazement and applaus.

The Roundtable always takes some time to get started, but from about 11:00 it starts to get interesting.

The episode about American co-Masonry is number 76 and can also be found below.

(or click here if you prefer to go to YouTube).

(Masonic RoundtableYouTube)

(Masonic Roundtable, YouTube)

Shee

The one of the elders takeing the Booke and that hee or shee that is to be made mason shall lay their hands thereon, and the charge shall be given.

That’s from a text from 1693 (!), so well before the establishment of the ‘Premier Grand Lodge’ in 1717. Does this “York manuscript No. 4” refer to operative women, or women in speculative lodges? Wikipedia describes the document thus:

The group of masons calling themselves the Grand Lodge of All England meeting since Time Immemorial in the City of York continued to issue written constitutions to lodges, as their authority to meet, until the last quarter of the Eighteenth century. Surviving are York manuscripts numbers 1, 2, 4 and 5 (3 missing), the Hope manuscript, and the Scarborough manuscript, which turned up in Canada. Of these, York 4 has been the subject of controversy since it was first described in print. It is dated 1693, and was the first of the Old Charges discovered to have a separate Apprentice Charge, or a set of oaths specially for apprentices. The controversy was caused by the short paragraph describing how the oath was to be taken. “The one of the elders takeing the Booke / and that hee or shee that is to be made mason / shall lay their hands thereon / and the charge shall bee given”. Woodford and Hughan had no particular problem with this reading, believing it to be a copy of a much older document, and realising that women were admitted to the guilds of their deceased menfolk if they were in a position to carry on their trade. Other writers, starting with Hughan’s contemporary David Murray Lyon, the Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, insisted that the “shee” must be a scribal error for they, or a mistranslation of the Latin illi (they). Hughan failed to point out that the four lines in question are written in a competent hand in letters twice the size of the surrounding text, but riposted to Lyon that the Apprentice charge in York No 4, Harleian MS 1942, and the Hope manuscript outline the apprentice’s duties to his master or Dame. Modern opinion seems resigned to letting York Manuscript number 4 remain a paradox.

Thanks to Karen Kidd for bringing this to my attention.

Forgetting something

Karen Kidd quotes a text from “The Very Ills Bro. Bertha Williams 33°”. Williams looks back at her time as leader of the American Federation of Human Rights. She attended one of ‘her’ lodges and did not like what she experienced. Her friend asked if she did not forget something.

Well […] as a matter of fact, you are forgetting several things. […] In the first place, you are not a Master of that Lodge; you are not even a member. You do not even know those people, and you have no responsibility for them. You are judging a situation by appearances, with very little background to it; you may be entirely wrong. But whether you are wrong or right, the main thing that you are forgetting is this: You are not in the work  because of what it may mean to somebody else. You are in it because of what it means to you. Now either you believe in it or you do not. If you do not believe in it – if you feel it has no intrinsic value, that is really not important to the H.O.A.T.F.M., that fundamentally it cannot and would not be of service to humanity – then get out of it. If you think it is important, get to work! Do whatever you have on your desk to do. Do it as perfectly as you can. This is your assignment – EVER – to mind your own business, whatever it may be, and let other people mind theirs. If every member would be content to do just that, then half of our problems would never occur … [sic] That is what I do – attend to my own assignment; that is what you have to dom.

Haunted Chambers

Just heard about this book “Haunted Chambers, The Lives Of Early Women Freemasons“. I wonder if it is any good. I will let you know when I read it.

Looking for the Amazon link, I also saw a few other titles that could be interesting as well:

Plenty to read… Anybody know any of these titles? Are they any good?